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A modular vascular access training program for higher surgical trainees

Abstract

Introduction

Access surgery is delivered by vascular/transplant surgeons with a division that is defined by historic practice. This has resulted in an inconsistent training pattern. We aimed to design a focused, modular training program (The Brighton Vascular Access Fellowship) providing trainees with a reproducible level of exposure and competence.

Methods

The programme was 16 days over 8 weeks on a one-to-one basis with candidates expected to be performing procedures as first surgeon with ongoing, formative assessment. The outpatient setting took the format of a one-stop clinic to involve planning and the follow-up. Assessment was through caseload exposure and conventional statistical analyses to obtain median values (as proxy measures of training exposure consistency). Assessment of confidence and capability was through an electronically distributed qualitative survey tool.

Results

A total of 14 candidates completed the programme by June 2017. Operative exposure was obtained for 11 (79%) with a total of 471 cases of which 286 were conducted as first surgeon. There was a median of 32 cases by each candidate with 25 of the cases performed as first surgeon. Qualitative assessment revealed that 13 of 14 (93%) were either practicing independently or no longer required the trainer to scrub in for the operation. A total of 13 of 14 (93%) strongly agreed that they felt comfortable with offering a basic access service.

Conclusions

Focused modular training might be one of the answers to the current era of restricted and sometimes inconsistent training in some aspects of surgery. This model is reproducible and may be applicable in other aspects of training.

Post author correction

Article Type: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE

Article Subject: Dialysis

DOI:10.5301/jva.5000821

Authors

Mark Edwards, Alexander D. Rodway, Islam G. Ahmed, Richard A. Harvey, Tamer S. Foad, Karim M. El Sakka

Article History

Disclosures

Financial support: No grants or funding have been received for this study.
Conflict of interest: None of the authors has financial interest related to this study to disclose.

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Authors

Affiliations

  • Department of Vascular Surgery, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals, Brighton - UK

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